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So Many Me Review: Puzzling Cuteness

So Many Me Review: Puzzling Cuteness

So Many Me is a 2D puzzle platformer akin to the likes of Braid or Limbo. Unfortunately,  almost every aspect of the game is built on foundations we’ve seen numerous times before and as a result nothing about the game feels particularly new or interesting.

You play as an amorphous blob of Green Goo that has been chosen to save the world from some unknown ancient by solving a bunch of puzzle stages. You are granted the power to create clones of yourself when you find these magical seeds that are placed strategically throughout the levels which then allows your clones to transform into various objects that are used to help solve the puzzles. The story is completely nonsensical and the game would have probably been better served without it, as the only means of delivering the narrative is through irritating dialogue sequences that are so annoying that I ended up instantly buttoning through the whole thing whenever they showed up.

Gameplay simply involves reaching the exit of the stage by solving various platforming puzzles. To do this, you will use numerous different powers that are acquired along the way. The first power you acquire and the game’s main platforming mechanic involves turning one of your clones into a block of stone that can be used as a platform to traverse gaps, hold down buttons or block things off. It’s a mechanic that has been used many times before in numerous other games and as a result, very few puzzles feel particularly challenging or really give you that “Aha!” moment of when you figure out the solution. The mechanic is more often than not used to traverse the stage quickly by putting down the block, jumping forward, quickly picking up the block and then putting it back down again.

Controlling these actions requires discipline and memorisation as you can place as many blocks as you have clones, but retrieving the blocks deletes the last placed block that was put down. So if you aren’t careful, hammering on the buttons to place and retrieve your blocks could delete a block you didn’t want removed and send you plummeting to your death. Luckily, the only punishment for death is a split-second reload time before you are placed back at one of the generous (perhaps too generous) checkpoints placed throughout the stages. Overall the controls and platforming feels solid, though the movement and traversal does feel a little slow.

The game’s artstyle is very reminiscent of a Flash Cartoon with big bright colours and bold outlines. It is very obviously leaning into the cutesy, cartoon aesthetic and it looks fine, but isn’t particularly interesting or memorable. On the other hand, the music is pretty great and really adds a lot of charm and individuality to the levels.


Throughout the stages are a myriad of hard-to-reach collectibles that usually provide a decent challenge if you want to collect them all. One of these collectibles is a customisation item that you can equip your individual blobs with. These customisation options are pretty darn adorable and I would often force myself to seek these out before finishing the level.

Overall So Many Me is a very familiar experience with little to set itself apart from other games in the genre. If you’re looking for a simple puzzle-platforming experience, you could do a lot worse than So Many Me. There isn’t really anything particularly egregious about the game, it’s just completely forgettable and your time could probably be better spent elsewhere.

Final Say: Skip It

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