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Slice It! Review: To Pieces

Slice It! Review: To Pieces

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Modern mobile gaming has split into two very distinct and completely opposite categories. In one corner sit deep, rewarding games, complete with experiences rivaling that of a home console. Think, Donkey Kong Country Returns, Bravely Default or even the Pokémon series. In another corner sit Bejewled, Angry Birds and Pixel People, games made to be “enjoyed” in short bursts consisting of minutes, perhaps seconds. "Timewasters", as they are called are more akin to being played on the toilet than on a long car ride.

I'll let you guess which corner Slice It! finds itself filed under.

First, let me be blunt Timewasters are not all bad and the term is not made to be derogatory. Even a man such as I have poured countless hours into perfecting my city in Pixel People and for a brief moment Candy Crush Saga was indeed on my phone. Timewasters have a place in gaming as much as Mario or Solid Snake, but it is important to understand the limitations and expectations that come with such a release. Slice It!, is a perfect example of this anomaly.

In Slice It!, you are tasked with using your finger or stylus to dissect a shape into a predetermined number of equal shapes. The more equal parts you create by slicing, the better your score. Shapes and tasks range in difficulty to dividing a circle into eight pieces, to dividing... whatever the hell this thing below is into several different shapes.

Challenges quickly graduate from slightly irritating to maddeningly frustrating, particularly to individuals who don't possess the skill set to solve these type of puzzles. If you are among the ranks of humanity that enjoy torturing themselves with these types of puzzles, then perhaps the need for pixel perfect control will finally be the straw that sends you hurling your phone or DS across the room.

While attempting to solve many of the puzzles involving multiple lines, I noticed that unless I was using slow, calculating motions, the game would detect that I had not properly intersected my lines and create an extra shape. So my eight slice circle example from earlier now contains a little diamond or circle shaped piece in the middle that is maybe ten or so pixels across. While it is true that a game of this nature should require such finesse in it's controls, the frequency in which I experienced a stray line creating a new shape was a definite annoyance.

Like most games of this type, music and background noise is an afterthought. I can't really fault the developer for this trait though, as it's standard operating procedure for less than stellar music to accompany this type of gameplay. Needless to say you'll be playing this game with the sound off, that is unless the sound of a piano being tuned set to the menu music of Mario Paint is your idea of a symphony.

Aside from these two complaints, the game is sound and contains little flaws. Slice It! is very unique in the sense that there is not a good game or a bad game complaint to be made. Slice It! has won many awards in it's lifetime as a mobile game, and the experience is pretty much the same on the Nintendo 3DS. Much like pro wrestling or comic books, you'll either like it or you won't.

Final verdict: Play it if...

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